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Continuous glucose monitoring benefits for athletes

Continuous glucose monitoring benefits for athletes

Ebnefits CAS Google Glucosr. As intensity levels rise there is a crossover in which the body starts to utilize more glucose and less fat. Article CAS PubMed Google Scholar Coggan AR, Coyle EF. Keshet A, Shilo S, Godneva A, Talmor-Barkan Y, Aviv Y, Segal E, et al.

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Indeed, manufacturers of athlete-specific devices market these products as a "fueling gauge," enabling athletes to "push their limits longer and get bigger gains. Whether CGMs will provide reliable and accurate information and enhance sports nutrition knowledge and practice is currently untested.

Caveats around the use of CGMs include technical issues dislodging of sensors during periods of surveillance, loss of data due to synchronization issuespractical issues potential bans on their use in some sporting scenarios, expenseand challenges to the underpinning principles of data interpretation, which highlight the role of sports nutrition professionals to provide context and interpretation.

Keywords: carbohydrate availability; continuous glucose monitor; interstitial glucose; low energy availability. Abstract This review discusses the potential value of tracking interstitial glucose with continuous glucose monitors CGMs in athletes, highlighting possible applications and important considerations in the collection and interpretation of interstitial glucose data.

Publication types Review. Substances Blood Glucose Glucose.

: Continuous glucose monitoring benefits for athletes

What types of fuel are used in exercise, and how do they cause fatigue? Cryer PE. Open Access Womens health supplement article is licensed under a Continuous glucose monitoring benefits for athletes Commons Attribution 4. CGM benefots can assist monitoeing in making significant Glucoee to their training routines, including the identification and prevention of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, and adjusting nutritional intake by altering pre-workout meals or snacks according to real-time glucose levels. Med Sci Sports Exerc. Wasserman DH. Ruiz JR, Fiuza-Luces C, Garatachea N, Lucia A. Cardiorespiratory Fitness Lowers Risk of Cancer.
The benefits of using a CGM for fitness, and how to add it into your training plan Gain real-time data to better predict and prevent glucose spikes or dips — crucial benefits of continuous glucose monitoring for maintaining top performance. This article unpacks how CGM can be your ally against diabetes, ensuring that every sprint, swim, or cycle is backed by precise glucose control. Health in the News. The body releases glucose from muscle glycogen particles during intense exercise, contributing to the maintenance of steady blood glucose levels, provision of energy, and postponement of fatigue. When I met with Davis in , they were hoping to get approval for non-prescription sales by mid Diabetes can impact athletic performance through increased urination and loss of water weight, as well as fluctuations in insulin levels during and after exercise.
How CGMs Can Improve Your Fitness Performance

Struggling to balance glucose levels with athletic demands? Discover how continuous glucose monitoring offers you the edge in diabetes management. Gain real-time data to better predict and prevent glucose spikes or dips — crucial benefits of continuous glucose monitoring for maintaining top performance.

This article unpacks how CGM can be your ally against diabetes, ensuring that every sprint, swim, or cycle is backed by precise glucose control. The challenges these athletes face are unique and require special attention. The American Diabetes Association recommends CGM for its ability to provide athletes with real-time data, enabling prompt adjustments in nutrition and insulin dosing.

This flexibility is beneficial for optimizing energy levels, preventing adverse glucose events like hypo- or hyperglycemia during exercise, and supporting comprehensive glucose management. These components work together to provide continuous monitoring of blood glucose levels for individuals with diabetes mellitus, including athletes.

Athletes with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus need to manage their glucose levels effectively. This is vital in maintaining optimal glucose levels during moderate to intense physical activities.

Preventing low glucose levels, which could lead to a shift in energy source to fatty acids, is imperative for sustaining peak performance. CGM devices can assist athletes in regulating carbohydrate intake during physical activity, effectively supplying energy and consequently enhancing their athletic performance.

Diabetes can impact athletic performance through increased urination and loss of water weight, as well as fluctuations in insulin levels during and after exercise. However, with appropriate management, such as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, athletes with diabetes can achieve high levels of performance and enhance glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity through exercise.

Physical activities can cause fluctuations in glucose levels in individuals with diabetes. Here are some key points to keep in mind:. Minimizing health risks associated with diabetes during training and competition requires athletes to undertake several steps. They should:. This approach is necessary for optimal blood glucose control and prevention of potential diabetes complications.

With the advent of diabetes technology like CGM, athletes can now have a better understanding of their glucose levels and metabolic demands. This enables them to:. CGM technology has revolutionized diabetes management, especially for athletes. This continuous monitoring offers a significant advantage over traditional diabetes technology.

The CGM sensor continuously monitors and records glucose levels at regular intervals, calculating them in real-time. This allows for the detection of fluctuations in blood glucose levels, including sudden spikes or drops.

These fluctuations could potentially be missed with traditional blood glucose monitoring. In essence, CGM technology provides athletes with diabetes the tools they need to actively manage their condition.

By offering:. The real-time data provided by CGM systems can help athletes with diabetes in the following ways:. CGM empowers athletes to take control of their diabetes management and optimize their performance.

The body releases glucose from muscle glycogen particles during intense exercise, contributing to the maintenance of steady blood glucose levels, provision of energy, and postponement of fatigue. Effective glucose management is also vital for facilitating muscle recovery and growth after exercise.

It plays a crucial role in replenishing muscle glycogen stores and initiating muscle tissue repair and adaptation, both of which are vital for facilitating muscle recovery and growth. Consuming high-glycemic index foods in the hours following exercise can expedite the restoration of muscle glycogen.

Insufficient glucose management can result in diminished athletic performance as it compels the body to depend on fat as a fuel source, leading to increased ketone bodies.

Additionally, it can cause symptoms such as polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, weight loss, visual disturbances, and fatigue. Hence, maintaining optimal glucose levels is not just important for immediate performance, but also for the long-term health and career of the athlete.

The strategies employed by athletes with diabetes to effectively regulate their fuel intake during training and competitions using CGM data include monitoring and adjusting their carbohydrate intake during physical activity. This helps ensure a sufficient energy supply and enhances their performance.

Continuous Glucose Monitoring CGM provides insights into blood glucose trends over extended durations, enabling the examination of the impact of various factors on blood glucose levels.

This personalized approach is key to optimizing performance and managing diabetes effectively. CGM data plays a significant role in influencing the dietary decisions of athletes with diabetes by offering real-time insights into how various factors, including nutritional choices, physical activity, and stress, impact their blood glucose levels.

This enables them to make well-informed decisions regarding their dietary choices. CGM data is utilized to measure postprandial blood glucose changes, enabling athletes with diabetes to make informed decisions based on data regarding the composition and timing of meals for maintaining balanced blood glucose control and overall health.

Athletes can utilize CGM data to determine the impact of different foods on glycemic control, leading to potential adjustments such as selecting low glycemic index carbohydrates, increasing fat or protein intake, and decreasing consumption of high glycemic index carbohydrates.

CGM data assists athletes in making well-informed dietary decisions prior to, during, and after training sessions and competitions to reduce blood sugar fluctuations. The primary risks for athletes with diabetes are hypo- and hyperglycemia. It is important to prevent hypoglycemia and also to be mindful of the possibility of hyperglycemia.

Proactive monitoring with CGM can help athletes manage these health risks. CGM technology facilitates proactive health management for athletes with diabetes through the provision of real-time glucose data, optimization of fuel intake, enhancement of training strategies, improvement of performance, and reduction of the risk of hypoglycemia.

Real-time alerts in CGM systems offer immediate notifications and alarms to diabetic athletes regarding their glucose levels, enabling them to promptly adjust their management and mitigate the risk of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia during physical activities.

Apart from preventing hypo- and hyperglycemia, CGM can assist in managing other health risks, such as cardiac events, by offering real-time glucose data to adjust insulin and carbohydrate intake during exercise.

The potential risks associated with hypo- and hyperglycemia in athletes include the exacerbation of hyperglycemia during exercise and the potential for hypoglycemia, which can be a feared complication in diabetic athletes.

Extreme glucose levels can have a negative impact on athletic performance. Symptoms of hypoglycemia in athletes may encompass weakness, shakiness, and fatigue. Meanwhile, symptoms of hyperglycemia may involve nausea, dehydration, decreased cognitive function, fatigue, rapid breathing, increased thirst, and increased urination.

Continuous Glucose Monitoring CGM aids in the prevention of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in athletes with diabetes by providing continuous monitoring of their glucose levels and issuing alerts when their blood sugar levels are outside the target range. Additionally, it can assist in identifying and avoiding the short-term adverse effects of training sessions, such as hypoglycemia.

Proactive monitoring through CGM functions by promptly identifying glycemic fluctuations during exercise sessions, enabling the refinement of exercise routines and insulin doses to mitigate blood glucose fluctuations.

CGM data can be utilized to assist athletes with diabetes in enhancing their training routines by:. Maintaining proper glucose levels is essential during the training and recovery phases as it provides energy for muscle rebuilding, contributes to the clearance of metabolic waste, and replenishes energy stores.

Additionally, muscles produce an insulin-like effect that significantly increases glucose uptake during exercise. Research has shown that continuous glucose monitoring CGM has potential advantages in managing diabetes for athletes, such as:.

CGM data can assist athletes in making significant modifications to their training routines, including the identification and prevention of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, and adjusting nutritional intake by altering pre-workout meals or snacks according to real-time glucose levels.

CGM data can aid in decreasing the risk of injury by providing objective recovery measurement, optimizing pre-exercise nutrition, personalizing nutritional strategies, and minimizing hypoglycemia episodes.

Indeed, there exist case studies showcasing athletes who have notably enhanced their performance through the utilization of CGM data. These instances illustrate personalized glucose profiles and the effectiveness of CGM in assessing recovery methods and regulating carbohydrate consumption in light of physical activity.

In essence, CGM provides valuable insights that can help athletes optimize their training routines. The real-time glucose data from CGM devices can guide athletes in tailoring their training programs, providing them with the necessary information to adjust their routines, nutritional intake, and recovery strategies for optimal performance.

Regulated glucose levels benefit athletic recovery by enhancing glucose regulation, improving insulin sensitivity, and promoting glycemic control, all of which are essential for athletes after exercising.

Whether CGMs will provide reliable and accurate information and enhance sports nutrition knowledge and practice is currently untested.

Caveats around the use of CGMs include technical issues dislodging of sensors during periods of surveillance, loss of data due to synchronization issues , practical issues potential bans on their use in some sporting scenarios, expense , and challenges to the underpinning principles of data interpretation, which highlight the role of sports nutrition professionals to provide context and interpretation.

Keywords: carbohydrate availability; continuous glucose monitor; interstitial glucose; low energy availability. Abstract This review discusses the potential value of tracking interstitial glucose with continuous glucose monitors CGMs in athletes, highlighting possible applications and important considerations in the collection and interpretation of interstitial glucose data.

Publication types Review.

Athletes are often arhletes in collecting Fiber optic internet provider Emotional eating awareness and strategies metrics in order to Athletrs the effectiveness of their training, and with Continuouss reason. However, in glhcose instances, data does not necessarily benwfits in a Moniforing way ath,etes instead just becomes more background noise. This may indeed be the case Continuois continuous Insulin resistance symptoms monitoring CGMthe latest metric to enter the athletic realm without much reason to. Before I get into the science that either supports or refutes the use of these devices, we need to first understand the basic physiology of glucose control in the body — then we can discuss whether or not monitoring it makes any sense. The nutrients that we take in when we eat serve many purposes but one of the principal ones is to provide metabolic fuel for our cells. Fuel comes in many forms but the preferred form for all of our cells is glucose and that is obtained through the consumption of carbohydrates. Continuous glucose monitoring benefits for athletes

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The Truth About Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs)

Continuous glucose monitoring benefits for athletes -

CGMs replaced the traditional finger stick blood test, which could only provide a snapshot of blood glucose at a point in time, while the CGM provides a full-length continuous documentary of your glucose levels.

For those with Type 1—especially athletes who exert themselves and have a high demand for blood glucose—CGMs were a game changer and potential lifesaver. Now companies are bringing CGMs to the masses to help them manage their blood sugar and metabolic health to hopefully avoid Type 2 diabetes and other chronic disease, as well as improve fitness and performance.

The three biggest players right now are NutriSense, Levels, and Supersapiens which is not yet available in the U. Some experts are hailing CGMs as the gateway to better health for millions of Americans, who have high levels of chronic metabolic disease. The UCI has banned them in cycling competition.

When you're working out at a high intensity , muscles break down glycogen or stored glucose for fuel. Meanwhile, the liver releases glycogen to raise your blood sugar.

Both mechanisms give you the energy you need to perform. Once your glycogen stores run dry, you start relying on fat, which can go a long way, but it can only be used at low intensities , so you have to dial down the pace—sometimes dramatically—and watch your competitors roll away.

These are, of course, general recommendations, and CGMs may help you pinpoint what you actually need. Ultimately, the amount of energy we need depends on our fitness the fitter the athlete, the more energy is needed to fuel that fitness.

In those circumstances, you want a nice stable, moderate glucose level. Your body regulates your glucose to maintain a relatively constant baseline. It does so through insulin and muscle contraction, Lim says.

Either way, the body is always trying to keep blood glucose levels very constant. Low levels hypoglycemia bring about shakiness, irritability, weakness, and irregular heartbeat.

High levels are problematic, too, especially over time. High levels of sugar overload the liver, increase inflammation , and lead to higher amounts of stored fat. When you have a large spike, your body needs to release more insulin to bring those levels down. Repeat that process over and over and you can develop insulin resistance where the cells become unresponsive to insulin and let the excess sugar course through your system.

That sets the stage for chronically high glucose levels and Type 2 diabetes. On the general health front, a CGM can be a powerful tool, Lim says. Liquid carbs crank up your blood sugar levels.

That requires looking at what you eat, but also when you eat, your state of mind, and your overall lifestyle. CGMs help you fine tune your fueling strategy before, during, and after a ride. It can also help you understand the lag time between the fuel you take in and the increase in glucose with different foods and drinks, which can help you time your fueling better.

Overall, the real value of CGMs is just that: dialing in your fueling plan during and around training rather than trying to use it in real time as a fuel gauge. CGM technology is very useful for preride and prerace fueling strategies , Lim says.

When you eat, glucose levels rise, which triggers insulin to bring blood sugar down by moving it into muscle. But if you start exercising in that window, you also have your contracting muscles moving even more glucose out of the bloodstream. A CGM helps you figure out the timing and composition of those before-exercise meals and snacks.

Or if your event is super early, you could be best off just eating a little right before and fueling as you go. With experimentation, you can learn the fueling strategy that works best for you as an individual, says former pro cyclist Brad Huff, global ambassador manager for Supersapiens.

Along with his seven-hour gel experiment, Collins has pulled similar multi-hour trainer sessions using Skratch Superfuel, Clif Bars, and various combinations of pure carbs and mixed macronutrient energy foods. Wearing a CGM also shows you the importance of early recovery nutrition , Huff says.

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Front Bioeng Biotechnol. Union Cycliste Internationale. Clarification guide of the UCI technical regulation. Download references. The Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, 33, Stockholm, Sweden.

You can also search for this author in PubMed Google Scholar. Correspondence to Mikael Flockhart or Filip J. Open access funding provided by Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences GIH.

The Swedish Olympic Committee and the Swedish Research Council for Sport Science provided funding for the research. L is a co-founder of svexa, a company that, in part, develops algorithms using wearable technology data, including continuous glucose data, to provide advice to coaches and athletes.

The potential conflict of interest has not influenced the impartiality of the research and the opinions expressed here are the personal opinions of the author. F declares no competing interests. F wrote the first draft of the manuscript and finalized it together with F. L is coordinating the studies on CGM in elite athletes mentioned in the manuscript.

F and F. L created the figures. Both authors read and approved the final version. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material.

If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. Reprints and permissions. Flockhart, M.

Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Endurance Athletes: Interpretation and Relevance of Measurements for Improving Performance and Health.

Sports Med Download citation. Accepted : 10 August Published : 02 September Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:. Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article.

Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative. Download PDF. Abstract Blood glucose regulation has been studied for well over a century as it is intimately related to metabolic health.

The origin of the maximal lactate steady state MLSS Article Open access 05 February A Perspective on High-Intensity Interval Training for Performance and Health Article Open access 07 October Impact of Cold-Water Immersion Compared with Passive Recovery Following a Single Bout of Strenuous Exercise on Athletic Performance in Physically Active Participants: A Systematic Review with Meta-analysis and Meta-regression Article Open access 14 February Use our pre-submission checklist Avoid common mistakes on your manuscript.

FormalPara Key Points Continuous glucose monitoring CGM has emerged as an easily assessable physiological metric and has come into use by endurance athletes with the objective of gaining insight into dietary needs and monitoring recovery and training load. Full size image. References Wasserman DH.

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This technology provides a unique opportunity to personalize and dial in your fueling strategy to ensure that it is most effective and least damaging.

These quantitative tools can give a snapshot of how the body is utilizing different sources of energy. What do you want to see from your CGM to optimize performance during competition?

If you are performing low-intensity exercise, then your blood sugar should not rise. Since the intensity of exercise is not high enough to cue your liver to mobilize stored glycogen, after you burn through the small amounts of glucose in circulation, your blood sugar should be steady as you primarily use fat for energy.

You can use the feedback provided by your CGM to check that you are exercising at your desired intensity. For example, if your goal is to utilize fat as a fuel source, or you have an easy day planned and want feedback to ensure you are not overexerting yourself, then you should shoot for your blood sugar levels to have a slight dip at the onset of exercise then be steady the rest of the workout.

A sudden increase in blood glucose could indicate your body is mobilizing stored glycogen to use as fuel, which is a sign that the intensity of the workout has increased beyond the capabilities of fat oxidation or that you ate something with carbohydrates right before your workout.

If the goal is to perform a low-intensity exercise and primarily utilize fat oxidation, this should be avoided. Fueling insights: No extra fuel is needed, nor will additional fuel enhance performance. Maximal muscle contractions are required to succeed.

In competition, these maximal contractions will need to be repeated to advance through the rounds and compete for the win. For muscles to produce a maximal contraction, they need adequate amounts of glucose. The muscles get this glucose from stored glycogen in the liver and the muscle cells themselves.

Often, people may see a rise in glucose during power sports as liver glycogen is released into the bloodstream as glucose to supply the muscles. Fueling insights: Stored liver and muscle glycogen will get you through the early parts of a power sports event.

Later in the event, eating a moderate amount of healthy glucose sources can help fuel maximal muscle contractions when glycogen may be running low. A little can go a long way, and big glucose spikes should be avoided, as they may lead to large insulin spikes that can impair fat oxidation and gluconeogenesis the process by which the body can make new glucose from other building blocks like lactate, glycerol, certain amino acids, and potentially ketone bodies in times of low glucose availability.

At high intensities, you will primarily be using glucose for energy, in the form of circulating glucose, glycogen, glucose ingested during the workout. On competition day, you want to make sure that you are not starting with extremely low blood sugar; if the athletic event starts at a high intensity, then you will be depleting your glycogen stores quickly, leaving you to rely on in-race feeding for any subsequent high-intensity efforts aka the sprint finish.

Checking your CGM can give you a sense of how much circulating glucose you have when you begin and is a clue as to whether fueling might be necessary during the workout. At the beginning of high-intensity exercise, your body secretes specific hormones called catecholamines, which cause glucose release from the liver to increase up to eight-fold.

Thus, it is not unusual to see a rise in your blood glucose at the beginning of a high-intensity workout. This rise is an indication that you are mobilizing your stored glycogen meaning the workout is too intense for your body to rely primarily on fat and needs to use glucose as fuel.

This increase in blood glucose during intense exercise can increase further immediately at exhaustion and persists for up to one-hour post-workout. If you are competing in a self-paced sport e.

This is an intriguing finding since less than 45 minutes of exercise should not deplete our glycogen stores fully; therefore, there should be no need for additional carbohydrates to fuel muscle contractions.

The brain signals illuminated by mouth rinsing can produce afferent signals that modify motor output. English Premier League athletes have been rinsing and spitting on the sidelines for years, as well as pro football players and runners.

If you started with low glycogen stores because you were fasting or in a ketogenic diet, you might want to supplement with some ingested carbohydrates towards the end of a workout to optimize performance, but you do not want to consume so much that you see a large spike in glucose levels, which would indicate a subsequent insulin surge and possible impairment of fat oxidation or gluconeogenesis for energy.

Fueling insights: Extra fuel is not required, nor will additional fuel enhance performance. Your stored glycogen can adequately fuel a couple of quick bursts.

However, if your muscle glycogen was low before beginning exercise because of a low carbohydrate diet or fasting, then you might see a drop in blood sugar after those quick bursts.

If the rest of your workout is low-intensity, then there is no need to fuel. Your fat can carry you through. However, if you still have a sprint or two left and your workout begins to encroach upon the middle ground between low and high intensity, you can take in small amounts of carbohydrates as tolerated to help you finish the last few sprints strong.

Fueling insights: Extra fuel is not required as glycogen stores should be sufficient in a healthy individual to sustain 75 minutes of activity. This can be achieved by mouth rinsing with carbohydrate solution or ingesting small amounts of carbohydrates as tolerated predominantly in the form of glucose and low in fiber.

Liquid carbohydrates grams per hour should be consumed at minute intervals throughout the exercise. Remember, the average person who has neither fasted nor followed a low carbohydrate diet has about 90 minutes worth of high-intensity exercise fuel stored as glycogen.

As these become depleted, glucose values on a CGM may start to dip, which may indicate that you want to fuel during your workout. When fueling before a workout to ensure optimal glycogen stores for a longer high-intensity workout, it seems that a good option is to ingest carbohydrates hours before the workout , rather than immediately before the workout meaning any time within 60 minutes of the workout.

This is because the carbohydrates will likely generate a glucose and insulin surge, and that insulin can impair fat oxidation and gluconeogenesis. If this happens hours before the workout, the glucose will be stored as glycogen, and the insulin will likely recover down to normal levels by the time of initiation of the workout.

On your CGM, this would look like a small glucose rise hours before the workout that returns to baseline by the time of the athletic event. Getting some carbs in, but not in extreme excess, will likely support the optimal hormonal balance.

Fueling insights: Aim for grams of carbohydrate per hour predominantly in the form of glucose and low in fiber. Liquid carbohydrates should be consumed at min intervals throughout exercise, while gels are optimally consumed every min. We need more research assessing the use of mouth rinsing for exercise lasting longer than 70 minutes, but it is unlikely that it will be as effective as consuming carbohydrates, as in this case, we actually need the fuel.

Thus, your best bet is to consume your fuels rather than rinse and spit. Fueling ideas to achieve optimal CGM feedback: Select your liquid, gel, or food of choice and shoot for consuming grams of carbohydrate per hour in a ratio of glucose to fructose to optimally utilize multiple transport methods.

Glucose uses GLUT2 and GLUT4 channels to transport across the cell membrane, and fructose uses GLUT5 channels. Thus, by utilizing both of these transmembrane carriers, you can maximize the amount of fuel entering the cell. A ketogenic keto diet involves an extremely low intake of carbohydrates intended to encourage the body to burn fat as fuel.

Beefits Guide. How to use continuous Moniitoring monitoring CGM to guide Amazon Customer Reviews during athletic events. Colleen Gulick, PhD. But what about the time between the coffee and the protein shake? Should athletes be eating during the workout? If so, how much, when, and what should they eat to optimize performance?

Author: Shaktishicage

4 thoughts on “Continuous glucose monitoring benefits for athletes

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