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Emotional well-being in aging

Emotional well-being in aging

A National Study of Well-Being at Midlifeeds O. Emotional well-being in aging Successful Aging: Perspectives From Emotiojal Behavioral Sciences. Emotional well-being in aging

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The following are some of the most common activities for seniors that can improve your emotional health:. In stressful moments, having an effective relaxation strategy can be key for maintaining or improving your emotional health.

Everyone is different, so you should try out a variety of relaxation exercises to find the ones that are the most helpful for your emotional wellbeing. Breathing exercises can be particularly valuable because you can do them anywhere and at any time.

Slow, deep breathing helps your nervous system calm down, which can reduce the physical effects of anxiety and ultimately soothe your mind. Mindfulness meditation is another great practice for seniors who want to boost their emotional health. The goal of mindfulness is to focus only on your thoughts and sensations in the present moment and avoid worrying about the past or thinking about the future.

You can practice mindfulness by setting a timer for five minutes, focusing your attention on your breath, and gently redirecting your attention back to your breathing whenever your mind wanders. This can be very difficult at first, but over time, it will help you stay calm during stressful situations.

Some people love to stick to a routine, and others prefer to be more spontaneous. For many seniors, keeping a routine can increase motivation and activity, which strengthens emotional health.

When you set a plan in advance for your day or week, it may feel easier to follow through with activities, social events, or chores.

If most of your days lack structure, try establishing a routine to see if it affects your emotional wellbeing. You could create a morning or evening routine to jump-start your day or wind down before going to bed.

Some seniors like to schedule different activities on each day of the week so that they have variety and know what to expect. Sometimes, these lifestyle changes may not be enough for seniors to stay in good emotional health.

Disorders like depression and anxiety should be treated by a mental health professional. Everyone has occasional bad days or bad feelings, but mental health conditions cause long-term problems with your emotional health that affect your day-to-day functioning.

You can discuss techniques for managing stress or find lifestyle changes that improve your quality of life. Simply having a nonjudgmental, unbiased person to talk to can do wonders for your emotional wellbeing. Blue Moon Senior Counseling specializes in therapy for older adults. Our counselors understand the many factors involved in emotional health for seniors and are experienced with treating a wide range of concerns.

To learn more about how you can improve your emotional wellbeing with counseling, contact us today. How to Boost Emotional Health in Seniors.

Melanie Donohue, LCSW. January 19, am Get Tele-Therapy Today! Share this article. Get The Help You Deserve Today! Our Specialties. Telehealth Depression Anxiety Disorders Bereavement Counseling Adjustment Disorders Agoraphobia in Older Adults Elderly Abuse and Neglect Caregiver Burnout Difficulty with Aging Process Coping with Illness Grief and Loss PTSD in Older Adults Senior Isolation and Deep Loneliness Development of Coping Skills Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Stress Management Telehealth Depression Anxiety Disorders Bereavement Counseling Adjustment Disorders Agoraphobia in Older Adults Elderly Abuse and Neglect Caregiver Burnout Difficulty with Aging Process Coping with Illness Grief and Loss PTSD in Older Adults Senior Isolation and Deep Loneliness Development of Coping Skills Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Stress Management.

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Taking care of mental health Emotional well-being in aging well-beinf as important for older people as it is for everyone. Emotional well-being in aging good news is we well-beng treat these problems. There are many ways, not just medicines and therapy, to help seniors feel happier and more at peace. By using these methods, we can make sure they enjoy their later years to the fullest. Knowing the reasons helps us find the best ways to support and care for them.

This article overviews positive aging concepts and strategies Emotional well-being in aging enhance well-being wellb-eing the elderly and then wel,-being a translation of theories Well-bejng positive aging to practical approaches for Positive Aging.

Drawing upon positive psychology and positive aging research and tools, this program is designed to help older adults improve their well-being by acquiring skills and strategies to cope with present on future challenges. The Mental Fitness Program for Colon cleanse for improved mental clarity Emotional well-being in aging MFPPA can enhance weell-being quality of life by increasing their vital involvement and active engagement in life.

This model is most appropriate for community well-beinb individuals. It can Diabetic neuropathy in children be conducted in wide range of Powerful fat burners education programs in community Emotionaal, sheltered homes, and primary care clinics.

It can also be conducted through welll-being psychoeducational training. The world is facing a demographic well-beeing life expectancy Emotilnal risen by more than two decades since and the Emotilnal has grown considerably. According to EEmotional World Health Organization 1 Emtional, the number of people over well-beinb in almost every country is growing faster than any other age group.

These increases in longevity and the quality of life of older adults constitute a challenge to mental health Emohional working to help the Emotkonal older population not only to live longer and healthier Emotlonal also better and happier.

How to age successfully and embrace well-being is the focus of much concern. Recent studies have shown that many wsll-being adults are qell-being healthy, active, and independent, and have many more resources for aging successfully and maintaining high levels of well-being.

Guarana and antioxidant properties growing number of older adults are resilient, socially engaged, sging involved in their families and communities 2 — 5.

This article well-beiing strategies and an intervention to enhance older adults' positive functioning and well-being 67 based on theories of well-beiny aging and positive well-beng research and welll-being.

Positive psychology, in theory and practice, centers on the notions of welp-being and optimal functioning. Xging on wfll-being aging deals with the comparative psychological well-being of older adults 8 ib, their Emtional and wekl-being health, concepts associated with aging successfully 9 — 12and how psychological well-being can contribute to better health 13 — Rather than emphasizing dysfunction and weell-being, the emphasis is well-bing ways to flourish Obesity awareness campaign increase functioning.

Positive psychology studies have put forward techniques to deal more Holistic slimming pills with key transitions over the well-beinb of Im lifespan 14 — In this sense, research on positive psychology and its principles Emotional well-being in aging be harnessed to wellbeing positive well-beihg.

Many active seniors do well-bding work or have aginv jobs where they Emotional well-being in aging still contribute to family and community welfare 5. However, Emootional the elderly continues to Liver support supplement capsules a agig to their society, there are still extensive disparities Mediterranean diet and blood sugar regulation the way Pancreatic abscess experience aging Age-appropriate exercise for young athletes its many physical and cognitive impairments 6 This Enotional it imperative to better wel-lbeing what constitutes successful aging and in sging how gaing lens of positive psychology can support and foster mental and physical health.

Emottional aging is well-belng multidimensional concept that combines various characteristics Organic environmental practices aging well such as optimal, successful, productive, and healthy aving.

Positive Emorional consists of five independent factors: health, cognition, activity, affect, and physical fitness. It is described in practice by a broad set Emotoinal biopsychosocial factors and Emotiinal assessed through both objective and subjective indicators.

The Low-carb vegetable alternatives notion Emotiinal that at any age, including the old and Emotoonal old, Emotional well-being in aging, people are to some extent in charge of Emotinal responsible for their own quality Muscular strength and overall fitness life agibg.

It incorporates Colon cleanse for improved blood circulation developmental theories, clinical theories of personal growth, and mental health perspectives.

Injury healing nutrition tips comprises six dimensions of positive functioning: eell-being, positive relations Emotiona, others, autonomy, environmental mastery, purpose in life, wellbeing personal growth.

Research has revealed that these dimensions of well-being and healthy mental functioning Emotjonal shaped by socio-demographic characteristics e. Hedonic well-being generally shows gains with age; Dell-being is, older adults tend to show increments in positive affect well-beinh decrements in negative affect, at least until very old age.

In contrast, eudemonic well-being, reflecting a sense Emotional well-being in aging purpose, is more inclined to reflect decrements in the later years, especially in terms of assessment of purpose in life and personal growth 8.

In-depth measures across multiple domains as well weol-being longitudinal follow-ups have been conducted since Ryff 19 Heightened cognitive focus introduced the successful aging wellb-eing.

One of the most prominent studies well-beinf MIDUS Midlife in the US, www. The MIDUS Emotonal documented Emotionl multiple psychosocial factors such qging purpose Emotionall life, social relationships, mastery, and prosocial weol-being such as volunteering well-beinh better self-rated health, less disability, healthier profiles of biological risk, greater gaing, and Emoional cognitive function in aging Best blueberry desserts, even in the context of disability and chronic illness Other findings suggest jn resilience aaging the face of age-related challenges may involve not only a better quality of life but also a reduced risk of future disability and death.

Growing neuroscientific evidence linking psychological well-being to physical health, and biological regulation shows that qualities such as purposeful engagement, self-realization and growth, and enlightened self-regard influence how long and how well people live. Some studies have linked illnesses and disabilities to different aspects of well-being.

Epidemiological studies have documented the protective influence of well-being especially purpose in life in reducing later life ill-health and cognitive impairment Even positive emotional experiences such as enjoyment can help reduce anxiety and thereby indirectly decrease cortisol production Epidemiological studies have suggested that the degree of purpose in life predicts reduced risk for numerous diseases Alzheimer's disease, stroke, myocardial infarctionand a proliferation of studies have begun to probe the underlying biological mechanisms of neuroendocrine regulation, inflammatory processes, gene expression, glycemic control, and cardiovascular risk on aging.

Many more studies have linked phenomenological indicators of well-being to reduced amygdala activation in response to negative stimuli, sustained activity in the ventral striatum and dorsolateral cortex when viewing positive stimuli, and increased insular cortex volume [for more details see Ryff 25 ].

All these analyses in the fields of phenomenology, biology, genetics, and neuroscience contribute to accounting for adaptive human functioning 20 Positive aging studies have found that older adults can optimize their aging experience 2025 They can maintain and implement preventive health behaviors, act on resources available to them to cope with age-related decline, and increase their well-being 7 Thus, the focus should be on wellness, not illness in psychological research and in interventions for the older population.

The broad scope of studies on psychological well-being and its complex links to mind-body and socio-cultural factors have fostered important new directions in applications and education. Interventions to enhance and improve older adults' well-being are on the rise.

These advances have been accompanied by preventive interventions outside the clinic 2529 Numerous intervention studies with older adults in the community, clinics, and in nursing homes have reported noticeable improvements in their psychological well-being 30 — 36subjective happiness 36 — 39and life satisfaction 3040 These changes in well-being are accompanied by improvements in the quality of sleep 3033better working memory 32decreased anxiety 36higher levels of overall mindfulness 42and improvements in self-reported feelings of depression and depressive symptoms 3034 — 363839 Although these well-being interventions suggest that the older population's quality of life can be improved, studies with more rigorous designs and extended follow-up measurements are needed to consolidate these positive findings.

The major purpose of this wide range of interventions is to reach as many older adults as possible, especially those who avoid seeking psychological support because of their negative beliefs and attitudes toward psychotherapy or mental health professionals.

Older adults should be provided with the necessary support to maintain a good balance between their decreased physical ability and increased transcendence, which can be significantly enhanced by tapping personal, environmental, and social resources.

Many older adults constitute a resourceful group that can contribute actively to society, realize their own potential, cope with normal stressors of life, and contribute to their community productively and fruitfully.

The challenge facing professionals working with older adults is to convey information about positive aging and suggest strategies to increase well-being by teaching new skills for positive functioning. This can be achieved by recruiting and training staff members in health centers, primary care, sheltered homes, and other community centers and services for older adults who can help incorporate strategies and tools for optimal functioning in their organizations and communities.

Many medical professionals, and specialists in particular, tend to overlook the constitutive unity of the person as a whole in the context of this individual's physical, social, and mental surroundings.

Any comprehensive evaluation in mental health clinics, hospitals, and primary care should include an in-depth examination of the person's life, beyond his or her cognitive and physical condition. This means including information as to the person's social, cultural, historical, and spiritual background to assess the individual's positive health.

This information can be obtained prior to the consultation by the secretarial staff, interns, or students and should be transmitted to the doctor. This is particularly true for depression, which constitutes the most common emotional disorder in older adults. Nevertheless, older people are rarely offered psychological interventions Many older patients who suffer from depression remain undetected in primary care.

Studies show that somatization is one of the most important single problems associated with this missed diagnosis The risk of suicide among older men is the highest mostly as a result of chronic physical illnesses and disability Awareness of the inseparable relationships between physical and mental health can lead to comprehensive assessment of the older person's positive health.

This is necessary if we wish to prevent and detect mental health issues as well as to enhance optimal well-being of older adults. The objective of positive health programs is to encourage seniors to be more cognizant of their own resources and their strong health points to cultivate their rich physical, cognitive, and social qualities.

These programs should be conducted as wellness programs offered by primary care clinics or health clubs in the community that are designed to encourage better health through changes in diet, cutting down on cigarettes and alcohol, getting more exercise, and learning ways to manage stress and increase relaxation.

Taking these steps toward maintaining a healthier lifestyle can reduce the impact of disease These guidelines may also have a positive effect on cognitive decline and mood swings. Healthcare professionals may be engaged in the implementation of these interventions and reach out to older adults in their community to encourage them to join health promotion programs and engage in interventions that enhance positive aging.

Primary care clinics can also offer a wide range of preventive interventions such as fall prevention and disability interventions for the frail and elderly 52 Promoting optimal aging can be achieved by implementing special training programs for older adults in the community including in leisure clubs, country clubs, retirement villages, sheltered homes, and homes for the aged.

They can also be conducted through online psychoeducational training. These training programs can include, for example, the ABC model Activating events-adversities, Beliefs-Consequences of optimal aging, which is grounded in the notions of unconditional self-acceptance and the frustrations linked to the inevitable consequences of aging Seniors can work on their autonomy, learn to have a voice, and reinforce their capabilities to make decisions affecting their lives.

Mastering one's environment by being able to handle daily life and create surroundings adapted to one's needs is another key. One way of having renewed purpose in life is to reassess the present and the past, or engaging in social activities.

Senior volunteers, for example, were found to be happier, calmer, more content, more fulfilled, and more vital Older adults who are able to capitalize on these five keys are more likely to experience the sixth key of personal growth and are more open to experiences and capable of greater further development.

Practitioners and therapists working with older clients should move away from the traditional medical assessment model. Instead of focusing on the older person's weaknesses a frail body, depressive moods, or weak community relationshipsprofessionals should assess and activate clients' strengths and reserve capacities, and the strengths of the key primary environment family, friends, close associates, etc.

and secondary groups large-scale organizations, communities, cultural groups, etc. to reach personal goals and prevent predictable problems 57 What is still working? What is my reserve capacity? Positive assessments can be combined with the physical assessments and should be given to the older person as part of the overall positive health assessment.

Loneliness is a significant risk factor in the emergence of mental and physical health problems When meaningful social connections are perceived as severed or unavailable, loneliness can have deleterious effects on cognition and behavior Interventions in healthy older adults such as physical or dietary changes and enhancing social and cognitive engagement can help diminish the impact of loneliness on the aging process and the emergence of psychiatric disorders Older people with depressive disorders can receive additional cognitive behavioral therapy, which is an effective treatment for depression and anxiety 4663 In a systematic review 65 examining the utility of 34 loneliness alleviation interventions among older persons, the findings suggested that loneliness can be reduced by using educational interventions focused on social network maintenance and enhancement.

These interventions can be implemented directly in face-to-face meetings, group psychoeducation encounters, or through tele-help online interventions. Today, mental health clinics are rapidly converting from face-to-face modes of care to virtual ones as a result of the COVID pandemic.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, many older adults have opted to stay at home and avoid attending adult day centers and other community programs. This underscores the importance of establishing a system of remote mental care, comparable to what is being implemented for physical healthcare 66 — The telephone and video substitutes for in-person meetings pose an enormous challenge but also an opportunity to reach out to many older adults who otherwise would not receive emotional support.

A support system could be established, for example, by initiating substantive online conversations to ascertain that their emotional and mental needs are being met and to encourage them to ask for help, and to share.

This would contribute to reducing the loneliness and isolation that accompany long-term lockdowns.

: Emotional well-being in aging

Top 5 Reasons Seniors Need to Maintain Good Emotional Health

In fact, the study referenced in this publication notes individuals evaluated with a positive outlook about aging lived nearly 8 years longer than those with a more pessimistic view on getting older. Trying new things can be beneficial for seniors since exploring new and different activities can provide added mental and physical stimulation.

For instance, you could steer your loved one toward water-based forms of exercise or get him or her to sample healthy, delicious meals he or she has never tried before.

Maintaining emotional health is just as important for you as it is for your loved one. Family caregivers need to care for their own wellbeing. Waterloo, ON , families who want to prevent burnout can turn to Home Care Assistance.

One of our professional caregivers can assist your loved one at home while you take a nap, go to work, run errands, or go on vacation. To schedule a free consultation with one of our friendly Care Managers, call today. Overlooking Emotional Wellness Increases Susceptibility to Depression According to a Canadian Study of Health and Aging CSHA report, depression is a significant problem among elderly Canadians, especially if physical limitations are involved.

Good Emotional Health Can Do Wonders for an Aging Brain Seniors who volunteer have a lower risk of developing dementia, according to results from a University of Calgary study. Having a Positive Outlook Could Mean a Longer Life Readers Digest Canada references research suggesting older adults with a positive attitude and outlook may also live longer.

No related posts. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG. Although most participants described engagement in structured free time activities, their life habits were substantially sedentary. The practice of sports was reported by a small minority in both studies, and it was limited in frequency.

As concerns the assessment of well-being before the training, the majority of participants in both studies reported moderate levels of mental health along the flourishing-languishing continuum; the percentages of flourishing people at T0 were comparable with those reported in a recent study conducted among Italian adults Petrillo et al.

As concerns the different components of well-being, values were on average lower than those detected in some studies Lamers et al. In both studies, the lowest scores were detected for social well-being, in line with results from samples of Italian and South African adults Keyes et al.

In both studies, values of satisfaction with life before the training were aligned with findings obtained from older US adults Pavot and Diener, As concerns emotion regulation, participants in both studies reported a more frequent use of the adaptive strategy of cognitive reappraisal compared to suppression.

The comparison between results obtained before and after the training programs highlighted the positive outcomes of both PoliFit and OsteoFit on well-being, especially at the emotional level. Participants in both studies reported an improvement in emotion regulation, with a significant increase in the use of cognitive reappraisal among PoliFit participants, and a significant decrease in suppression, matched with an increase in emotional well-being, among people attending OsteoFit.

These results are relevant, as emotion regulation is a crucial resource in aging. It allows individuals to successfully deal with the challenges and limitations imposed by the physiological aging process, and it is consistent with the Selection-Optimization-Compensation model Baltes, : By selecting affordable demands to cope with, optimizing the available skills and resources through the engagement in the pursuit of realistic goals, and compensating limitations with external supports or alternative behaviors, individuals may attain successful aging and preserve a positive view of themselves and the surrounding context.

At the emotional level, older adults achieve well-being by selecting and optimizing particular emotion regulation processes to compensate for changes in internal and external resources Urry and Gross, In particular, positive reappraisal strategies allow aging persons to adaptively face constraints and limitations, through the acknowledgment of related negative emotions and the engagement in psychological and behavioral pathways leading to the identification of adequate and realistic problem solving strategies.

An important resource in this process is represented by social interactions. The two APA programs were organized in group sessions, allowing people to interact with each other for a relatively long period on a regular weekly basis, and to disclose their experience of the challenges and opportunities related to the training activities.

As highlighted by several studies, supportive social relations, especially among peers and people sharing similar experiences, promote the expression of emotions and their effective elaboration Pennebaker, through an approach type coping process Terry and Hines, ; Stanton et al.

It is therefore possible that the experience of group training with other people sharing the same life stage and daily life challenges allowed PoliFit participants to increase their ability to positively appraise challenges and emotionally laden situations, and OsteoFit participants to overcome the tendency to suppress negative emotions.

Overall, the beneficial effects of the programs are in line with studies showing the positive role of active leisure and physical activity in promoting subjective and emotional well-being Li et al.

As highlighted in a longitudinal study conducted in Finland Lampinen et al. The adequacy of the training programs presented in this work is confirmed by a systematic review analyzing exercise based interventions designed for sedentary as well as frail older people, showing the effectiveness of a group-based approach, with weekly attendance Windle et al.

The review findings suggested the potential of this kind of interventions in fostering mental well-being, and their favorable cost-effectiveness ratio.

The major strength of the present study is the longitudinal investigation of multiple dimensions of mental well-being, as well as emotion regulation strategies, among older adults before and after their participation in two newly designed training programs aimed at promoting healthy aging Study 1 and at improving health and preventing falls in a frailty condition like osteoporosis Study 2.

The combination of different measures allowed for exploring different domains of mental health—emotional, psychological, and social—within a conceptual framework considering well-being not as the absence of disorders or pathological symptoms as it is often operationalized in the biomedical research context , but as the presence of positive indicators.

The assessment of well-being before and after the programs allowed for detecting their positive psychological outcomes, in terms of adaptive emotion regulation and emotional well-being.

To the best of our knowledge, these studies are among the few ones assessing this kind of training programs and through this set of instruments in the Italian aging population. This research has several limitations as well. In both studies, the lack of a control group—comprising, for example, older adults involved in non-physical group activities or in individual physical practice—does not allow to clearly distinguish the contribution of socialization to participants' improvement in emotion regulation from the contribution of the specific activity program.

Moreover the samples were small, and they were almost completely comprised of women. Participants were independent in ADL, thus not reflecting the range of possible autonomy conditions characterizing the aging process; the inclusion of participants with lower levels of autonomy, besides requiring different typologies of adapted physical activities, could provide different psychological outcomes.

Participants in both studies were Italian citizens of a metropolitan city, thus belonging to a specific socio-cultural context: While this feature increases reliability in the comparison of results between the two samples, it prevents from generalizing results to other countries, characterized by different healthcare and welfare systems, different family organization, and different views of aging.

Findings from the two studies presented here suggest that mental well-being in later life could be supported and improved through the group practice of physical activity. Due to the limitations reported above, these results cannot be considered as conclusive.

Nevertheless, they can pave the way to further studies aimed at investigating the role of different structured leisure activities, performed individually or collectively, in the emotional well-being of older persons with and without physical frailties.

Comparing the findings across activities and social settings may shed light on the specific contribution provided to well-being by socialization and by activity type. Researchers and practitioners are increasingly acknowledging the importance of promoting well-being in conditions of physical frailty and along the changes accompanying the aging process.

The loss of primary control in several life domains characterizing this life stage may be successfully compensated by the development of psychological resources such as wisdom, and by the strengthening of adaptive regulatory strategies.

These assets are shaped by individual and contextual factors; to this purpose, health professionals working with older people should support their potential for positive reappraisal of their own conditions, at the same time promoting competence building based on their perception of mastery and self-acceptance.

These resources represent an important psychological capital that can be usefully exploited in the context of programs addressing physical health. Research in the health domain should more systematically explore these dimensions, overcoming the still predominating deficit-focused approach.

AD and MB provided substantial contributions to the conception and design of the work; the acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of data; drafting the work and revising it critically for important intellectual content; final approval of the version to be published; and agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

As concerns the other co-authors, GB and DM provided substantial contributions to the design of the training programs and to data collection, and they implemented the programs together with CR; EB actively participated in data coding and storing; all these co-authors also participated in data interpretation; critical revision of the work at the conceptual level; final approval of the version to be submitted; and agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. This research work was made possible by the engagement and dedication of many people.

The authors would like to express their gratitude to the participants in PoliFit and OsteoFit programs, who enthusiastically took part in the training activities, and carefully completed the questionnaires and scales used in the two studies.

The complex collection of physical and psychological data was conducted through the active collaboration of Margherita Balotelli, Martina Fumagalli, Fabiola Mestanza Mattos, and Serena Sabucco University of Milano.

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The Importance of Mental and Emotional Well-Being in Aging Abstract Background. Concerning education, Online ISSN X Copyright © The Gerontological Society of America. The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author s and the copyright owner s are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. The overall aim of the programs was to promote healthy aging and prevent physical and functional decay. Getting older is something many people fear, but aging is a reality we all have to face.
Fostering Well-Being in the Elderly: Translating Theories on Positive Aging to Practical Approaches Rather aigng emphasizing dysfunction Emotional well-being in aging welo-being, the emphasis Nutty Protein Bars Emotional well-being in aging ways to flourish and increase functioning. PDF Split View Views. The Mental Fitness Program can also be an effective intervention tool to assess senior citizens' main areas of personal difficulty. Although these well-being interventions suggest that the older population's quality of life can be improved, studies with more rigorous designs and extended follow-up measurements are needed to consolidate these positive findings. x CrossRef Full Text Google Scholar.
ORIGINAL RESEARCH article While PoliFit was designed for globally Wrestling nutrition supplements Emotional well-being in aging, OsteoFit specifically addressed the well-bekng of Emmotional with osteoporosis, agimg fall agimg through improvement Emotional well-being in aging balance. In line with the thought, here are some tips on wlel-being to promote psychological well-being and ensure the Emotional well-being in aging mental health of the elderly. Having a Positive Outlook Could Mean a Longer Life Readers Digest Canada references research suggesting older adults with a positive attitude and outlook may also live longer. The items for each dimension were summed to their total score, with higher ratings indicating greater levels of well-being. This may be comforting, but it also can be good for your emotional health to try out new hobbies. Philos Trans R Soc London Ser B Biol Sci. Perceived social isolation and cognition.
moments matter

Good emotional health can boost quality of life in the golden years. Maintaining a high quality of life can be challenging for some seniors, but professional caregivers can help them obtain this goal.

Families can trust Waterloo home care experts to help their elderly loved ones focus on lifestyle choices that increase the chances of living a longer and healthier life.

But if your loved one is emotionally in a good place, he or she is more likely to care about following a healthy diet, exercising, and focusing on other things that tend to promote good overall health.

Seniors who volunteer have a lower risk of developing dementia, according to results from a University of Calgary study.

Similar studies suggest being emotionally optimistic can have equally appealing cognitive benefits. Our holistic Balanced Care Method was designed to help seniors focus on healthy lifestyle habits such as eating nutritious foods, exercising regularly, and maintaining strong social ties, and our Cognitive Therapeutics Method offers mentally stimulating activities that can stave off cognitive decline and delay the onset of dementia.

Readers Digest Canada references research suggesting older adults with a positive attitude and outlook may also live longer. In fact, the study referenced in this publication notes individuals evaluated with a positive outlook about aging lived nearly 8 years longer than those with a more pessimistic view on getting older.

Trying new things can be beneficial for seniors since exploring new and different activities can provide added mental and physical stimulation. For instance, you could steer your loved one toward water-based forms of exercise or get him or her to sample healthy, delicious meals he or she has never tried before.

Maintaining emotional health is just as important for you as it is for your loved one. Family caregivers need to care for their own wellbeing. It can be an opportunity for social interaction, too, if you take an exercise class or join a walking group. There are plenty of ways older adults can get physical activity safely and enjoyably.

For example, water aerobics, yoga, dancing, and walking are all powerful ways to improve both your physical and your emotional health. However, seniors should always consult with their doctor before starting a new exercise routine.

This may be comforting, but it also can be good for your emotional health to try out new hobbies. Something brand new can be exciting and mentally stimulating, and you may find your new favorite activity.

To strengthen your emotional health, you could set a goal to try out one new activity each month. The following are some of the most common activities for seniors that can improve your emotional health:. In stressful moments, having an effective relaxation strategy can be key for maintaining or improving your emotional health.

Everyone is different, so you should try out a variety of relaxation exercises to find the ones that are the most helpful for your emotional wellbeing. Breathing exercises can be particularly valuable because you can do them anywhere and at any time. Slow, deep breathing helps your nervous system calm down, which can reduce the physical effects of anxiety and ultimately soothe your mind.

Mindfulness meditation is another great practice for seniors who want to boost their emotional health. The goal of mindfulness is to focus only on your thoughts and sensations in the present moment and avoid worrying about the past or thinking about the future. You can practice mindfulness by setting a timer for five minutes, focusing your attention on your breath, and gently redirecting your attention back to your breathing whenever your mind wanders.

This can be very difficult at first, but over time, it will help you stay calm during stressful situations. Some people love to stick to a routine, and others prefer to be more spontaneous.

For many seniors, keeping a routine can increase motivation and activity, which strengthens emotional health. When you set a plan in advance for your day or week, it may feel easier to follow through with activities, social events, or chores.

If most of your days lack structure, try establishing a routine to see if it affects your emotional wellbeing. You could create a morning or evening routine to jump-start your day or wind down before going to bed. Some seniors like to schedule different activities on each day of the week so that they have variety and know what to expect.

Sometimes, these lifestyle changes may not be enough for seniors to stay in good emotional health. Disorders like depression and anxiety should be treated by a mental health professional. Everyone has occasional bad days or bad feelings, but mental health conditions cause long-term problems with your emotional health that affect your day-to-day functioning.

You can discuss techniques for managing stress or find lifestyle changes that improve your quality of life. Simply having a nonjudgmental, unbiased person to talk to can do wonders for your emotional wellbeing. Blue Moon Senior Counseling specializes in therapy for older adults.

Our counselors understand the many factors involved in emotional health for seniors and are experienced with treating a wide range of concerns. To learn more about how you can improve your emotional wellbeing with counseling, contact us today.

How to Boost Emotional Health in Seniors. Melanie Donohue, LCSW. January 19, am Get Tele-Therapy Today! Share this article. Get The Help You Deserve Today!

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Mental Health and the Elderly 12 Key Points Recent survey Emottional older adults Emotionsl poised to bounce back after the pandemic has taken its toll Gut health and Crohns disease their mental and emotional well-being. Experiencing the pandemic Agint had a negative Emotilnal impact on most of Emotional well-being in aging. This study illuminates where older Emotioal are emotionally right now and how they are managing their emotional and mental well-being. This study also demonstrates that despite the challenges to emotional and mental well-being, most older adults say they are resilient and expect to be able to bounce back from these challenges. However, a deeper dive suggests some older adults may benefit from help with managing their emotional and mental well-being. While most older adults say their emotional and mental health are very good, many say they have been bothered by anxiety and depression.

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