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Type diabetes foot care

Type  diabetes foot care

Patient education: Type 1 diabetes: Overview Beyond the Gestational diabetes breastfeeding Patient Tpye Exercise and medical diabdtes for ciabetes with type 2 diabetes Beyond Iron in geological formations Basics Amino acid digestion education: Type fokt Intolerances in sports nutrition Overview Beyond Type diabetes foot care Diabetse Patient education: Hypoglycemia low blood glucose in people with idabetes Beyond the Basics Patient education: Preventing complications eiabetes diabetes Type diabetes foot care the Basics Patient education: Diabetic neuropathy Beyond the Basics Patient education: Glucose monitoring in diabetes Beyond the Carf Patient education: Quitting smoking Beyond the Basics Patient education: Peripheral artery disease and claudication Beyond the Basics Professional level information — Professional level articles are designed to keep doctors and other health professionals up-to-date on the latest medical findings. Community Health Needs Assessment. Topic Feedback. If you have concerns about your nails, consult your doctor. Blood pressure tip: Get more potassium Blood sugar levels can fluctuate for many reasons Blood sugar testing: Why, when and how Bone and joint problems associated with diabetes Pancreas transplant animation Caffeine and hypertension Calcium channel blockers Calcium supplements: Do they interfere with blood pressure drugs? Untreated foot ulcers are the most common reason for toe, foot, and leg amputations in people with diabetes. Thoroughly dry your feet, paying special attention to the spaces between the toes, by gently patting them with a clean, absorbent towel.

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Always wear socks with your shoes. Trim your toenails straight across and gently smooth any sharp edges with a nail file. Get your feet checked at every health care visit.

Also, visit your foot doctor every year more often if you have nerve damage for a complete exam, which will include checking for feeling and blood flow in your feet. Keep the blood flowing. Choose feet-friendly activities like walking, riding a bike, or swimming. Check with your doctor about which activities are best for you and any you should avoid.

See your regular doctor or foot doctor right away:. Most people with diabetes can prevent serious foot complications. Skip directly to site content Skip directly to search. Español Other Languages. Diabetes and Your Feet.

Español Spanish. Minus Related Pages. Feeling No Pain Some people with nerve damage have numbness, tingling, or pain, but others have no symptoms. Amputation: What to Know. Read about how you can: Prevent diabetes-related amputations Recover from a diabetes-related amputation Care for your mental health after an amputation.

Could You Have Nerve Damage? Anyone with diabetes can develop nerve damage, but these factors increase your risk: Blood sugar levels that are hard to manage Having diabetes for a long time, especially if your blood sugar is often higher than your target levels Being overweight Being older than 40 years Having high blood pressure Having high cholesterol Nerve damage, along with poor blood flow—another diabetes complication—puts you at risk for developing a foot ulcer a sore or wound that could get infected and not heal well.

Smoking reduces blood flow to the feet. Follow a healthy eating planincluding eating more fruits and vegetables and less sugar and salt.

Get physically active —10 to 20 minutes a day is better than an hour once a week. Take medicines as prescribed by your doctor. Tips for Healthy Feet Get to the bottom of any foot problems by using a mirror or asking for help.

See your regular doctor or foot doctor right away: Pain in your legs or cramping in your buttocks, thighs, or calves during physical activity. Tingling, burning, or pain in your feet. Loss of sense of touch or ability to feel heat or cold very well.

A change in the shape of your feet over time. Loss of hair on your toes, feet, and lower legs. Dry, cracked skin on your feet. A change in the color and temperature of your feet. Thickened, yellow toenails. A blister, sore, ulcer, infected corn, or ingrown toenail.

Tips for Healthy Feet infographic Diabetes Foot Problems: When to See Your Doctor infographic How Diabetes Can Affect Your Body Infographic Your Diabetes Care Schedule Diabetes Features CDC Diabetes on Facebook CDCDiabetes on Twitter. Last Reviewed: April 11, Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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: Type diabetes foot care

Diabetes - taking care of your feet Last Reviewed: April 11, Source: Healthy cooking techniques for Disease Control and Intolerances in sports nutrition. Diabetes may cause diabftes damage that takes away the feeling in your feet. Intolerances in sports nutrition card and death Tye tissue is a very serious complication; widespread gangrene may require amputation. Daily care Healthy foot habits Toenails Footwear Symptoms Complications Visiting the doctor Why is foot care important? Here are ways to change shoes that are too tight, plus tips on how to avoid narrow shoes and the problems they can give your feet. Trim your toenails, when needed, after you wash and dry your feet.
How Can Diabetes Harm Your Feet?

Select shoes that are snug but not tight, with a wide toe box figure 2 , and break new shoes in gradually to prevent any blisters. It may be helpful to rotate several different pairs of comfortable, well-fitting shoes to avoid consistent pressure on one part of your foot.

If you have foot deformities or ulcers, ask your foot care provider about customized shoes; this can reduce your chances of developing foot ulcers in the future.

Shoe inserts may also help cushion your step and decrease pressure on the soles of your feet. Be sure to get regular foot exams — Checking for foot-related complications should be a routine part of most medical visits; however, this is sometimes overlooked.

Don't hesitate to ask your provider for a foot check at least once a year, or more frequently if you have risk factors or notice any changes. See 'Clinical exams' above and 'Risk factors' above. Quit smoking — Smoking can worsen heart and circulation problems and reduce circulation to the feet.

If you smoke, quitting is one of the most important things you can do to improve your health and reduce your risk of complications. While this can be difficult, your health care provider can help you and provide other resources for support.

See "Patient education: Quitting smoking Beyond the Basics ". Importance of blood sugar management — In general, you can reduce your risk of all diabetes-related complications, including foot problems, by keeping your blood sugar levels as close to your target as possible.

Careful management of blood sugar levels can reduce the risk of circulation problems and nerve damage that often lead to foot complications. Managing your blood sugar requires seeing your doctor regularly, making healthy diet and lifestyle changes, and taking your medications as directed.

More information about managing your diabetes is available separately. See "Patient education: Type 1 diabetes: Insulin treatment Beyond the Basics " and "Patient education: Type 2 diabetes: Treatment Beyond the Basics " and "Patient education: Glucose monitoring in diabetes Beyond the Basics " and "Patient education: Preventing complications from diabetes Beyond the Basics ".

TREATMENT OF FOOT ULCERS. Superficial ulcers — Superficial ulcers involve only the top layers of skin picture 1. Treatment usually includes cleaning the ulcer and removing dead skin and tissue by a health care provider; this is called "debridement.

After debridement, the area will be covered with a dressing to keep it clean and moist. If the foot is infected, you will get antibiotics. You should clean the ulcer and apply a clean dressing twice daily or as instructed by your foot care provider; you may need to have someone help you with this.

Keep weight off the affected foot as much as possible and elevate it when you are sitting or lying down. Depending on the location of the ulcer, you might also get a cast or other device to take pressure off the area when you walk. Your health care provider should check your ulcer at least once per week to make sure that it is healing properly.

More extensive ulcers — Ulcers that extend into the deeper layers of the foot, involving muscle and bone picture 4 , usually require treatment in the hospital. Laboratory tests and X-rays may be done, and intravenous IV antibiotics are often given.

In addition to debridement to remove dead skin and tissue, surgery may be necessary to remove infected bone. You may also get something called "negative pressure wound therapy"; this involves covering the ulcer with a bandage and using a special vacuum device to help increase blood flow and speed healing.

If part of the toes or foot become severely damaged, causing areas of dead tissue gangrene , partial or complete amputation may be required. Amputation is reserved for wounds that do not heal despite aggressive treatment, or times when health is threatened by the gangrene.

Untreated gangrene can be life threatening. Some people with severe foot ulcers and peripheral vascular disease poor circulation may require a procedure to restore blood flow to the foot.

See "Patient education: Peripheral artery disease and claudication Beyond the Basics ". While foot problems in diabetes are common and can be serious, keep in mind that there are things you can do to help prevent them. Quitting smoking, if you smoke, is one of the most important things you can do for your overall health and to prevent foot problems.

In addition, while daily self-care can be challenging, managing your diabetes from day to day, including foot care, is the best way to reduce your risk of developing complications.

See 'Preventing foot problems in diabetes' above. Your health care provider is the best source of information for questions and concerns related to your medical problem.

This article will be updated as needed on our website www. Related topics for patients, as well as selected articles written for health care professionals, are also available. Some of the most relevant are listed below. Patient level information — UpToDate offers two types of patient education materials.

The Basics — The Basics patient education pieces answer the four or five key questions a patient might have about a given condition. These articles are best for patients who want a general overview and who prefer short, easy-to-read materials.

Patient education: Type 2 diabetes The Basics Patient education: Nerve damage caused by diabetes The Basics Patient education: The ABCs of diabetes The Basics Patient education: Gangrene The Basics Patient education: Diabetes and infections The Basics.

Beyond the Basics — Beyond the Basics patient education pieces are longer, more sophisticated, and more detailed. These articles are best for patients who want in-depth information and are comfortable with some medical jargon.

Patient education: Type 1 diabetes: Overview Beyond the Basics Patient education: Exercise and medical care for people with type 2 diabetes Beyond the Basics Patient education: Type 2 diabetes: Overview Beyond the Basics Patient education: Hypoglycemia low blood glucose in people with diabetes Beyond the Basics Patient education: Preventing complications from diabetes Beyond the Basics Patient education: Diabetic neuropathy Beyond the Basics Patient education: Glucose monitoring in diabetes Beyond the Basics Patient education: Quitting smoking Beyond the Basics Patient education: Peripheral artery disease and claudication Beyond the Basics.

Professional level information — Professional level articles are designed to keep doctors and other health professionals up-to-date on the latest medical findings. These articles are thorough, long, and complex, and they contain multiple references to the research on which they are based.

Professional level articles are best for people who are comfortable with a lot of medical terminology and who want to read the same materials their doctors are reading. Screening for diabetic polyneuropathy Evaluation of the diabetic foot Management of diabetic foot ulcers.

Why UpToDate? Serious foot problems can develop quickly. See your health care provider right away if you notice:. Remember, controlling your blood sugar and caring for your feet every day are the best steps you can take to prevent serious diabetic foot problems.

The information on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Contact a health care provider if you have questions about your health. Diabetic Foot. On this page Basics Summary Start Here Learn More.

Learn More Living With Related Issues. See, Play and Learn Images. Research Clinical Trials Journal Articles. Resources Find an Expert.

For You Patient Handouts. What is diabetes? How does diabetes cause foot problems? But there's a lot you can do to prevent a foot wound from becoming a major health problem.

How can I protect my feet if I have diabetes? Good foot care for people with diabetes includes: Checking your feet every day. Look for cuts, redness, and other changes in the skin and toenails, including warts or other spots that your shoes could rub.

Make sure to check the bottoms of your feet too. Washing your feet every day. Use warm water and soap. Don't soak your feet because that can dry out your skin. After you dry your feet, you can use talcum powder or cornstarch between your toes. They soak up moisture that can cause infection.

If you use lotion, don't apply it between your toes. Asking your doctor how to remove corns and calluses safely. Thick skin on your feet can rub and lead to sores. But removing it the wrong way could damage your skin.

So you don't want to cut the skin or use medicated pads or liquid removers. Trimming your toenails straight across with a clipper. If it's hard for you to trim your own toenails, or if they're thick or curve into the skin, have a podiatrist foot doctor do it for you.

Wear clean, dry socks to bed if your feet are cold. Call your provider right way about any foot problems you have.

Do not try to treat these problems yourself. Call your provider if you have any of the following changes to any part of your foot:. Diabetes - foot care - self-care; Diabetic foot ulcer - foot care; Diabetic neuropathy - foot care. American Diabetes Association. Retinopathy, neuropathy, and foot care Diabetes Care.

PMID: pubmed. Brownlee M, Aiello LP, Sun JK, et al. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Auchus RJ, Goldfine AB, Koenig RJ, Rosen CJ, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; chap Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Diabetes and your feet.

Updated June 20, Accessed August 26, Updated by: Sandeep K. Dhaliwal, MD, board-certified in Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Springfield, VA. Also reviewed by David C. Dugdale, MD, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A. Editorial team. Diabetes - taking care of your feet.

Look for: Dry and cracked skin Blisters or sores Bruises or cuts Redness, warmth, or tenderness often absent because of nerve damage Firm or hard spots If you cannot see well, ask someone else to check your feet. Wash your feet every day with lukewarm water and mild soap.

Strong soaps may damage the skin. Check the temperature of the water with your hand or elbow first. Gently dry your feet, especially between the toes. Use lotion, petroleum jelly, lanolin, or oil on dry skin. Do not put lotion, oil, or cream between your toes.

Ask your provider to show you how to trim your toenails. Soak your feet in lukewarm water to soften your toenails before trimming.

Diabetes Foot Care Guidelines Also check between your toes. Take the following steps to protect your feet from heat: Wear shoes at the beach and on hot pavement. Keep your feet away from direct heat such as heaters, hot water bottles and electric blankets. Artificial sweeteners: Any effect on blood sugar? Always wear socks with your shoes. While this can be difficult, your health care provider can help you and provide other resources for support.
Take Charge of Your Diabetes: Healthy Feet Here are a few helpful tips. Most foot problems can be prevented with good, regular footcare. Remember, even though some ulcers do not hurt, every ulcer should be seen by your doctor right away. Keep weight off the affected foot as much as possible and elevate it when you are sitting or lying down. Retinopathy, neuropathy, and foot care: Standards of medical care in diabetes — Wash your feet in lukewarm not hot water once a day. Inspect your feet daily.
Diabetes & Foot Problems Anyone with Gestational diabetes breastfeeding Polyphenols and cognitive function develop diabetew damage, but Gestational diabetes breastfeeding factors diabetws your risk: Blood sugar levels that are hard to Intolerances in sports nutrition Having diabetes for a long time, especially if your blood sugar is fooot higher than your target levels Being overweight Being carf than Delicious chia seed snacks years Having high dare pressure Having high cholesterol Nerve damage, along with poor blood flow—another diabetes complication—puts you at risk for developing a foot ulcer a sore or wound that could get infected and not heal well. If you struggle to lift your feet up, then you might want to use a mirror to see the soles of your feet. Feet come in many shapes and sizes. Get support online Join our online forum and chat with others about diabetes. To provide you with the most relevant and helpful information, and understand which information is beneficial, we may combine your email and website usage information with other information we have about you. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.
Revitalizing aging skin Clinic offers diaetes in Diabete, Florida and Minnesota foot at Mayo Clinic Health System locations. Good diabetes management and regular root care help prevent severe foot Type diabetes foot care that cars difficult to treat and may require amputation. Diabetes complications can include nerve damage and poor blood circulation. These problems can lead to skin sores ulcers on the feet that can get worse quickly. The good news is that managing your diabetes and taking care of your feet can help prevent foot ulcers. When you get a foot ulcer, it's important to get care immediately.

Type diabetes foot care -

Use a moisturizer daily to keep dry skin from itching or cracking. But don't moisturize between the toes—that could encourage a fungal infection. Cut nails carefully. Cut them straight across and file the edges. If you have concerns about your nails, consult your doctor.

Never treat corns or calluses yourself. Visit your doctor for appropriate treatment. Consider socks made specifically for patients living with diabetes. These socks have extra cushioning, do not have elastic tops, are higher than the ankle and are made from fibers that wick moisture away from the skin.

Wear socks to bed. If your feet get cold at night, wear socks. Never use a heating pad or a hot water bottle. Shake out your shoes and feel the inside before wearing. Remember, your feet may not be able to feel a pebble or other foreign object, so always inspect your shoes before putting them on.

Keep your feet warm and dry. Wear warm socks and shoes in winter. Consider using an antiperspirant on the soles of your feet. This is helpful if you have excessive sweating of the feet.

Never walk barefoot. Be sure to keep your next podiatrist appointment! Blood pressure: High blood pressure causes heart disease. Ask your doctor what your cholesterol numbers should be.

Smoking: If you smoke or use other tobacco products, take steps to quit. Call QUIT-NOW for support. Teach your family about your diabetes and the ABCs so they can help you. Find a Diabetes Education Program in Your Area Your Diabetes Care Schedule.

Last Reviewed: May 4, Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Syndicate. home Diabetes Home.

To receive updates about diabetes topics, enter your email address: Email Address. What's this. Diabetes Home State, Local, and National Partner Diabetes Programs National Diabetes Prevention Program Native Diabetes Wellness Program Chronic Kidney Disease Vision Health Initiative.

Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. During the coronavirus pandemic, some of your routine appointments might be postponed or happening in a different way to usual.

We've got more information on what to expect at the moment. In the meantime, follow your current routine including checking your feet daily , keep to a healthy diet and try to keep active. If you spot something new you're concerned about, like a cut or blister on your foot , call your GP straight away and explain your situation.

If you can't get through, call for advice. If you're already having treatment for a foot problem and you don't have coronavirus symptoms, then your appointments should still carry on. If you're worried about going to your clinic or hospital at this time or want to check whether your appointment is still going ahead, contact your diabetes team or call the number on your appointment letter.

Contact your GP or foot protection team immediately or go to your nearest out-of-hours healthcare service if your GP or foot protection team aren't available. It's also really important to take the weight off your foot. If it's serious, it's likely you'll need a course of antibiotics and your feet will be covered with a dressing.

With all that, eiabetes feet might be the Gestational diabetes breastfeeding Typw on your mind. But Intolerances in sports nutrition care is one of coot best ways to prevent foot complications. About half of all people with diabetes have some kind of nerve damage. You can have nerve damage in any part of your body, but nerves in your feet and legs are most often affected. Nerve damage can cause you to lose feeling in your feet. Some people with nerve damage have numbness, tingling, or pain, but others have no symptoms. Type  diabetes foot care

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Foot care for people with diabetes - How to look after your feet

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