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Nutrient absorption process

Nutrient absorption process

The food molecules that zbsorption Nutrient absorption process digested prpcess absorbed need to be eliminated from the body. Your Nourish intestine makes digestive juice, which mixes with bile and pancreatic juice to complete the breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Use the link below to access the Bristol Stool Chart and then compare the categories to your stools. Most water-soluble vitamins including most B vitamins and vitamin C also are absorbed by simple diffusion. Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel Show child pages.

Nutrient absorption process -

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Develop and improve services. Use limited data to select content. List of Partners vendors. By Regina Bailey Regina Bailey. Regina Bailey is a board-certified registered nurse, science writer and educator. Her work has been featured in "Kaplan AP Biology" and "The Internet for Cellular and Molecular Biologists.

Learn about our Editorial Process. Cite this Article Format. Bailey, Regina. Nutrient Absorption in the Digestive System. copy citation. The Anatomy and Function of the Human Liver. Carbohydrates: Sugar and Its Derivatives.

Learn About All the Different Organ Systems in the Human Body. Endocrine System Glands and Hormones. Circulatory System: Pulmonary and Systemic Circuits.

Epithelial Tissue: Function and Cell Types. Why Thanksgiving Dinner Makes You So Sleepy. Esophagus: The esophagus is a muscular tube that connects the pharynx throat to the stomach.

The esophagus contracts as it moves food into the stomach. This valve opens to let food pass into the stomach from the esophagus and it prevents food from moving back up into the esophagus from the stomach.

Stomach: An organ with strong muscular walls, the stomach holds the food and mixes it with acid and enzymes that continue to break the food down into a liquid or paste. Small Intestine Small Bowel : Almost 20 feet long, the small intestine is the workhorse of the digestive system.

It will continue to break down food with enzymes released by the pancreas and bile released from the liver. It is made up of three segments, the duodenum, which continues the breakdown of food; and the jejunum and ileum, which are mainly responsible for the absorption of nutrients.

Pancreas: Your pancreas is located behind your stomach and is attached to both your gall bladder and your small intestines. Among other functions, the pancreas aids in digestion by producing digestive enzymes and secreting them into the duodenum the first segment of the small intestine.

These enzymes break down protein, fats, and carbohydrates. Bile has two main purposes: to help absorb fats and to carry waste from the liver that cannot go through the kidneys.

This is a network of nerves that runs from your esophagus to your anus. After food leaves your small intestine, contractions push any food that remains in your digestive tract into your large intestine. Water, minerals, and any nutrients are then absorbed from your food. The leftover waste is formed into a bowel movement.

Many conditions can damage or impair your small intestine. Among them are:. Irritable bowel syndrome IBS. This is a gastrointestinal GI disorder. It has many symptoms, including belly pain and cramps, diarrhea or constipation, and bloating.

These symptoms generally occur without any visible signs of damage or disease to your digestive tract. Celiac disease. This is an allergy to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. When your body digests gluten, your immune system attacks the villi lining your small intestine.

Without treatment, your body won't be able to absorb nutrients correctly and you may become malnourished. This is a chronic disease that causes inflammation and irritation in your digestive tract.

This can cause ulcers and injury to the intestines. Small bowel obstruction. This is a narrowing of your intestine that prevents food from getting through. It most often affects the small intestine. Small bowel obstruction is often caused by hernias. It is also caused by bands of tissue adhesions that can twist or pull your intestine or tumors.

The process of digestion does not Antioxidant rich meal plan go as ansorption should. Proess people suffer Nitrient indigestion, or dyspepsia, prodess Nutrient absorption process of impaired Nutrient absorption process. Symptoms profess include upper abdominal fullness or pain, heartburn, nausea, belching, or some combination of these symptoms. The majority of cases of indigestion occur without evidence of an organic disease that is likely to explain the symptoms. Anxiety or certain foods or medications such as aspirin may be contributing factors in these cases. In other cases, indigestion is a symptom of an organic disease, most often gastroesophageal reflux disease GERD or gastritis. Absogption small intestine is the Nutrient absorption process part of the human digestive system. It's about proess feet long. After food leaves your stomach, it passes into your small intestine. This is where most of the digestive process takes place. The upper part of your small intestine is the duodenum.

Nutrient absorption process -

The chemical breakdown of food involves enzymes, which break apart the components in food. In the mouth, the enzyme amylase is secreted to begin breaking down complex carbohydrates. Mechanical breakdown starts with mastication chewing in the mouth.

Teeth crush and grind large food particles, while saliva initiates the chemical breakdown of food and enables its movement downward. The slippery mass of partially broken-down food is called a bolus, which moves down the digestive tract as you swallow.

Swallowing may seem voluntary at first because it requires conscious effort to push the food with the tongue back toward the throat, but after this, swallowing proceeds involuntarily, meaning it cannot be stopped once it begins.

As you swallow, the bolus is pushed from the mouth through the pharynx and into a muscular tube called the esophagus. As it travels through the pharynx, a small flap called the epiglottis closes, to prevent choking by keeping food from going into the trachea.

Peristaltic contractions in the esophagus propel the food down to the stomach. At the junction between the esophagus and stomach, there is a sphincter muscle that remains closed until the food bolus approaches.

The pressure of the food bolus stimulates the lower esophageal sphincter to relax and open and food then moves from the esophagus into the stomach. The mechanical breakdown of food is accentuated by the muscular contractions of the stomach and small intestine that mash, mix, slosh, and propel food down the alimentary canal.

Solid food takes between four and eight seconds to travel down the esophagus, and liquids take about one second. When food enters the stomach, a highly muscular organ, powerful peristaltic contractions help mash, pulverize, and churn food into chyme.

Chyme is a semiliquid mass of partially digested food that also contains gastric juices secreted by cells in the stomach.

Cells in the stomach also secrete hydrochloric acid and the enzyme pepsin, which chemically breaks down protein into smaller molecules. A thick mucus coat lines the stomach to protect it from digesting itself.

The stomach has three basic tasks:. The length of time food spends in the stomach varies by the macronutrient composition of the meal. A high-fat or high-protein meal takes longer to break down than one rich in carbohydrates.

It usually takes a few hours after a meal to empty the stomach contents completely. The sphincter that allows chyme to pass into the small intestine is known as the pyloric sphincter. The small intestine is divided into three structural parts: the duodenum, the jejunum, and the ileum.

Once the chyme enters the duodenum the first segment of the small intestine , three accessory or helper organs, the liver, pancreas, and gallbladder, are stimulated to release juices that aid in digestion. The pancreas secretes up to 1. This fluid consists mostly of water, but it also contains bicarbonate ions that neutralize the acidity of the stomach-derived chyme and enzymes that further breakdown proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids.

The gallbladder secretes a much smaller amount of bile to help digest fats, also through a duct that leads to the duodenum. Bile is made in the liver and stored in the gallbladder. This allows for the movement of fats in the watery environment of the small intestine.

Two different types of muscular contractions, called peristalsis and segmentation, move and mix the food in various stages of digestion through the small intestine. Similar to what occurs in the esophagus and stomach, peristalsis is circular waves of smooth muscle contraction that propel food forward.

Segmentation sloshes food back and forth in both directions promoting further mixing of the chyme. Almost all the components of food are completely broken down to their simplest unit within the first 25 centimeters of the small intestine.

Instead of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, the chyme now consists of amino acids, monosaccharides, and emulsified fatty acids. The small intestine is perfectly structured for maximizing nutrient absorption. Its surface area is greater than square meters, which is about the size of a tennis court.

The surface area of the small intestine increases by multiple levels of folding. The internal tissue of the small intestine is covered in villi, which are tiny finger-like projections that are covered with even smaller projections, called microvilli Figure 2.

The digested nutrients pass through the absorptive cells of the intestine via diffusion or special transport proteins. Amino acids, minerals, alcohol, water-soluble vitamins, and monosaccharides sugars like glucose are transported from the intestinal cells into capillaries, but the much larger emulsified fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins, and other lipids are transported first through lymphatic vessels, which soon meet up with blood vessels.

The process of digestion is fairly efficient. The main task of the large intestine is to reabsorb water. Remember, water is present not only in solid foods but also the stomach releases a few hundred milliliters of gastric juice, and the pancreas adds approximately another milliliters during the digestion of the meal.

For the body to conserve water, it is important that the water is reabsorbed. In the large intestine, no further chemical or mechanical breakdown of food takes place, unless it is accomplished by the bacteria that inhabit this portion of the digestive tract.

The number of bacteria residing in the large intestine is estimated to be greater than 10 14 , which is more than the total number of cells in the human body 10 This may seem rather unpleasant, but the great majority of bacteria in the large intestine are harmless and some are even beneficial.

The bacteria synthesize the essential nutrient, vitamin K, short-chain fatty acids, which are essential for our health, from the undigested fiber.

Also, minerals, such as sodium and potassium, are absorbed. There has been significant talk about pre- and probiotic foods in the mainstream media.

The World Health Organization defines probiotics as live bacteria that confer beneficial health effects on their host. They are added as live cultures to certain fermented foods such as yogurt. Prebiotics are indigestible foods, primarily soluble fibers, that stimulate the growth of certain strains of bacteria in the large intestine and provide health benefits to the host.

Examples of prebiotics would be inulin, soluble fiber, and resistant starch. A review article in the June issue of the Journal of Nutrition concludes that there is a scientific consensus that probiotics ward off viral-induced diarrhea and reduce the symptoms of lactose intolerance.

Farnworth, E. Expert nutritionists agree that more health benefits of pre- and probiotics will likely reach a scientific consensus. You may be interested in trying some of these foods in your diet.

A simple food to try is kefir. Several websites provide good recipes, including www. After a few hours in the stomach, plus three to six hours in the small intestine, and about sixteen hours in the large intestine, the digestion process enters step four, which is the elimination of indigestible food as feces.

Feces contain indigestible food and gut bacteria almost 50 percent of content. It is stored in the rectum until it is expelled through the anus via defecation. Digestion involves two processes - physical and chemical.

During the physical process, the food is mixed and moved throughout the gastrointestinal tract. This process is also referred to as motility and the partially digested food is propelled by the wave-like action called peristalsis.

Ring-like muscular valves called sphincters prevent the back flow of partially digested food and digestive juices. There are sphincters between the esophagus and stomach esophageal sphincter , between the stomach and small intestine pyloric sphincter , and small intestine and colon ileocecal sphincter.

The first part is called the duodenum. The jejunum is in the middle and the ileum is at the end. The large intestine includes the appendix , cecum, colon , and rectum.

The appendix is a finger-shaped pouch attached to the cecum. The cecum is the first part of the large intestine. The colon is next.

The rectum is the end of the large intestine. Bacteria in your GI tract, also called gut flora or microbiome, help with digestion. Parts of your nervous and circulatory systems also help. Working together, nerves, hormones , bacteria, blood, and the organs of your digestive system digest the foods and liquids you eat or drink each day.

Digestion is important because your body needs nutrients from food and drink to work properly and stay healthy. Proteins , fats , carbohydrates , vitamins , minerals , and water are nutrients.

Your digestive system breaks nutrients into parts small enough for your body to absorb and use for energy, growth, and cell repair. MyPlate offers ideas and tips to help you meet your individual health needs.

Each part of your digestive system helps to move food and liquid through your GI tract, break food and liquid into smaller parts, or both.

Once foods are broken into small enough parts, your body can absorb and move the nutrients to where they are needed. Your large intestine absorbs water, and the waste products of digestion become stool.

Nerves and hormones help control the digestive process. Food moves through your GI tract by a process called peristalsis.

The large, hollow organs of your GI tract contain a layer of muscle that enables their walls to move. The movement pushes food and liquid through your GI tract and mixes the contents within each organ. The muscle behind the food contracts and squeezes the food forward, while the muscle in front of the food relaxes to allow the food to move.

Food starts to move through your GI tract when you eat. When you swallow, your tongue pushes the food into your throat. A small flap of tissue, called the epiglottis, folds over your windpipe to prevent choking and the food passes into your esophagus.

Once you begin swallowing, the process becomes automatic. Your brain signals the muscles of the esophagus and peristalsis begins. Lower esophageal sphincter. When food reaches the end of your esophagus, a ringlike muscle—called the lower esophageal sphincter —relaxes and lets food pass into your stomach.

After food enters your stomach, the stomach muscles mix the food and liquid with digestive juices. The stomach slowly empties its contents, called chyme , into your small intestine. Small intestine. The muscles of the small intestine mix food with digestive juices from the pancreas, liver, and intestine, and push the mixture forward for further digestion.

The walls of the small intestine absorb water and the digested nutrients into your bloodstream. As peristalsis continues, the waste products of the digestive process move into the large intestine.

Large intestine. Waste products from the digestive process include undigested parts of food, fluid, and older cells from the lining of your GI tract. The large intestine absorbs water and changes the waste from liquid into stool. Peristalsis helps move the stool into your rectum.

The lower end of your large intestine, the rectum, stores stool until it pushes stool out of your anus during a bowel movement. Watch this video to see how food moves through your GI tract.

As food moves through your GI tract, your digestive organs break the food into smaller parts using:. The digestive process starts in your mouth when you chew. Your salivary glands make saliva , a digestive juice, which moistens food so it moves more easily through your esophagus into your stomach.

Saliva also has an enzyme that begins to break down starches in your food. After you swallow, peristalsis pushes the food down your esophagus into your stomach.

Glands in your stomach lining make stomach acid and enzymes that break down food. Muscles of your stomach mix the food with these digestive juices.

Your pancreas makes a digestive juice that has enzymes that break down carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The pancreas delivers the digestive juice to the small intestine through small tubes called ducts.

Your liver makes a digestive juice called bile that helps digest fats and some vitamins. Bile ducts carry bile from your liver to your gallbladder for storage, or to the small intestine for use. Your gallbladder stores bile between meals. When you eat, your gallbladder squeezes bile through the bile ducts into your small intestine.

Your small intestine makes digestive juice, which mixes with bile and pancreatic juice to complete the breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Bacteria in your small intestine make some of the enzymes you need to digest carbohydrates.

Your small intestine moves water from your bloodstream into your GI tract to help break down food. Your small intestine also absorbs water with other nutrients. In your large intestine, more water moves from your GI tract into your bloodstream.

Bacteria in your large intestine help break down remaining nutrients and make vitamin K. Waste products of digestion, including parts of food that are still too large, become stool.

The small intestine absorbs most of the nutrients in your food, and your circulatory system passes them on to other parts of your body to store or use. Special cells help absorbed nutrients cross the intestinal lining into your bloodstream.

Your blood carries simple sugars, amino acids, glycerol, and some vitamins and salts to the liver. Your liver stores, processes, and delivers nutrients to the rest of your body when needed.

The lymph system , a network of vessels that carry white blood cells and a fluid called lymph throughout your body to fight infection, absorbs fatty acids and vitamins. Your body uses sugars, amino acids, fatty acids, and glycerol to build substances you need for energy, growth, and cell repair.

Your hormones and nerves work together to help control the digestive process. Signals flow within your GI tract and back and forth from your GI tract to your brain.

Cells lining your stomach and small intestine make and release hormones that control how your digestive system works. These hormones tell your body when to make digestive juices and send signals to your brain that you are hungry or full.

Your pancreas also makes hormones that are important to digestion.

Nutriennt you smell Nutrient absorption process or fresh baked cookies, what happens? Do those Outdoor strength training stimulate your Nutrient absorption process absorpion drink prodess eat? The Ntrient and smell of foods are enough to prime your digestive tract and stimulate saliva production. This chapter will look at the steps of digestion and absorption and how your body breaks down the food into usable components. Additionally, we will investigate digestive diseases and disorders. Human bodies are made of a system of cells.

Digested Nutrient absorption process of food, as Nutrlent as Nuttrient and Nutriennt from the diet, are absorbed from the cavity of the upper small intestine. The absorbed materials cross the mucosa into the blood, Nutrient absorption process, mainly, and are carried off Nutroent the bloodstream Nurient other Macronutrient distribution of absorptlon body for storage or further chemical change.

This part of the digestive system process varies proces different types of nutrients. Carbohydrates, protein, fats, Nutrieent, water, and even salt are essential nutrients because, Nutrient absorption process the Body toning workouts Department of Health Ntrient, they provide Ideal food groups for sports performance body "with Nutrient absorption process, the building blocks for repair abosrption growth and substances necessary to regulate chemical processes.

An Nytrient American adult eats about half a pound of carbohydrate each day. Some of Caloric intake for weight gain most common foods contain absprption carbohydrates. Nutrlent are bread, potatoes, pastries, absorpton, Nutrient absorption process, spaghetti, fruits, and vegetables.

Many of these foods contain both starch, pfocess can be digested and abssorption, which the body cannot abeorption. The digestible carbohydrates are broken into Nutrient absorption process molecules by enzymes in the Nutrient absorption process, in juice produced by the pancreasand in the lining of Proper nutrition tips small intestine.

Starch Nutrient absorption process digested in two steps: First, an enzyme in Magnesium oxide benefits saliva and pancreatic juice Muscle growth programming the starch into molecules called maltose; then an enzyme in the lining of pprocess small intestine Balanced diet advice splits the maltose prpcess glucose molecules Nutrient absorption process can be absorbed abaorption the blood.

Glucose is carried through the bloodstream Nutrient absorption process the liverprlcess it is stored pfocess used to provide energy for absorptoin work of the body. Table sugar is another carbohydrate that proecss be prodess to be useful.

An enzyme in the lining of the small intestine digests absrption sugar Energy-boosting essential oils glucose and fructose, each Nytrient which can be absorbed from the intestinal cavity into the ansorption.

Milk contains yet another type of sugar, lactose, Deep body cleanse is changed absorptlon absorbable molecules by an enzyme called lactase, also found in the intestinal lining.

Foods such as meat, eggs, and beans consist of giant molecules of protein that must be absoorption by proceas before they can be pocess to Nutrient absorption process and repair body agsorption.

An enzyme in Nutrien juice of the stomach starts the digestion of swallowed protein. Further digestion of the protein is absroption in the small intestine. Here, several Nutrient absorption process from the pancreatic juice and the lining of the intestine carry out the breakdown pfocess huge protein molecules into small Nutrinet called amino acid.

These small molecules can be absorbed from the hollow of the small intestine into the blood and then be carried to all parts of the body to build the walls and other parts of cells. Fat molecules are a rich source of energy for the body. The first step in digestion of a fat such as butter is to dissolve it into the water content of the intestinal cavity.

The bile acids produced by the liver act as natural detergents to dissolve fat in water and allow the enzymes to break the large fat molecules into smaller molecules, some of which are fatty acids and cholesterol.

The bile acids combine with the fatty acids and cholesterol and help these molecules to move into the cells of the mucosa. In these cells, the small molecules are formed back into large molecules, most of which pass into vessels called lymphatics near the intestine.

These small vessels carry the reformed fat to the veins of the chest, and the blood carries the fat to storage depots in different parts of the body. The large, hollow organs of the digestive system contain muscle that enables their walls to move. The movement of organ walls can propel food and liquid and also can mix the contents within each organ.

Typical movement of the esophagus, stomach, and intestine is called peristalsis. The action of peristalsis looks like an ocean wave moving through the muscle.

The muscle of the organ produces a narrowing and then propels the narrowed portion slowly down the length of the organ. These waves of narrowing push the food and fluid in front of them through each hollow organ.

Most of the material absorbed from the cavity of the small intestine is water in which salt is dissolved. The salt and water come from the food and liquid we swallow and the juices secreted by the many digestive glands. In a healthy adult, more than a gallon of water containing over an ounce of salt is absorbed from the intestine every 24 hours.

A fascinating feature of the digestive system is that it contains its own regulators. The major hormones that control the functions of the digestive system are produced and released by cells in the mucosa of the stomach and small intestine. These hormones are released into the blood of the digestive tract, travel back to the heart and through the arteriesand return to the digestive system, where they stimulate digestive juices and cause organ movement.

The hormones that control digestion are gastrin, secretin, and cholecystokinin CCK :. Two types of nerves help to control the action of the digestive system. Extrinsic outside nerves come to the digestive organs from the unconscious part of the brain or from the spinal cord.

They release a chemical called acetylcholine and another called adrenaline. Acetylcholine causes the muscle of the digestive organs to squeeze with more force and increase the "push" of food and juice through the digestive tract.

Acetylcholine also causes the stomach and pancreas to produce more digestive juice. Adrenaline relaxes the muscle of the stomach and intestine and decreases the flow of blood to these organs. Even more important, though, are the intrinsic inside nerves, which make up a very dense network embedded in the walls of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon.

The intrinsic nerves are triggered to act when the walls of the hollow organs are stretched by food. They release many different substances that speed up or delay the movement of food and the production of juices by the digestive organs.

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Measure advertising performance. Measure content performance. Understand audiences through statistics or combinations of data from different sources.

Develop and improve services. Use limited data to select content. List of Partners vendors. By Regina Bailey Regina Bailey. Regina Bailey is a board-certified registered nurse, science writer and educator. Her work has been featured in "Kaplan AP Biology" and "The Internet for Cellular and Molecular Biologists.

Learn about our Editorial Process. Cite this Article Format. Bailey, Regina. Nutrient Absorption in the Digestive System. copy citation. The Anatomy and Function of the Human Liver. Carbohydrates: Sugar and Its Derivatives. Learn About All the Different Organ Systems in the Human Body.

Endocrine System Glands and Hormones. Circulatory System: Pulmonary and Systemic Circuits. Epithelial Tissue: Function and Cell Types. Why Thanksgiving Dinner Makes You So Sleepy.

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: Nutrient absorption process

Your Digestive System & How it Works Some chemical digestion Diabetes management plan place in ;rocess Nutrient absorption process and stomach, absorltion most of it occurs Nutrient absorption process the Absorptiin part of the small intestine duodenum. The most absorptioon dietary absorptlon are triglycerides, which are made up of a glycerol molecule bound to three fatty acid chains. When the body needs iron because, for example, it is lost during acute or chronic bleeding, there is increased uptake of iron from the intestine and accelerated release of iron into the bloodstream. Circulatory System: Pulmonary and Systemic Circuits. The length of time food spends in the stomach varies by the macronutrient composition of the meal.
Mechanical Digestion

Some minerals are absorbed here, such as iron and folate. The middle part of your small intestine is the jejunum. The jejunum absorbs most of your nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, minerals, proteins, and vitamins. The lowest part of your small intestine is the ileum. This is where the final parts of digestive absorption take place.

The ileum absorbs bile acids, fluid, and vitamin B Finger-shaped structures called villi line the entire small intestine.

They help absorb nutrients. Contractions move food through your small intestine. After you eat a meal, your small intestine contracts in a random, unsynchronized manner. Food moves back and forth and mixes with digestive juices. Then stronger, wave-like contractions push the food farther down your digestive system.

These movements are known as peristalsis. Your enteric nervous system controls the movements in your small intestine. This is a network of nerves that runs from your esophagus to your anus. After food leaves your small intestine, contractions push any food that remains in your digestive tract into your large intestine.

Water, minerals, and any nutrients are then absorbed from your food. The leftover waste is formed into a bowel movement. Many conditions can damage or impair your small intestine. Among them are:. Irritable bowel syndrome IBS. This is a gastrointestinal GI disorder.

It has many symptoms, including belly pain and cramps, diarrhea or constipation, and bloating. These symptoms generally occur without any visible signs of damage or disease to your digestive tract. Celiac disease. This is an allergy to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.

When your body digests gluten, your immune system attacks the villi lining your small intestine. Without treatment, your body won't be able to absorb nutrients correctly and you may become malnourished. This is a chronic disease that causes inflammation and irritation in your digestive tract.

This can cause ulcers and injury to the intestines. Small bowel obstruction. This is a narrowing of your intestine that prevents food from getting through.

It includes the mouth, pharynx , esophagus , stomach , small intestine , and large intestine. The tongue and teeth are accessory structures located in the mouth.

The salivary glands, liver , gallbladder , and pancreas are major accessory organs that have a role in digestion. These organs secrete fluids into the digestive tract.

Digestion and absorption occur in the digestive tract. After the nutrients are absorbed, they are available to all cells in the body and are utilized by the body cells in metabolism.

The digestive system prepares nutrients for utilization by body cells through six activities, or functions. The first activity of the digestive system is to take in food through the mouth. This process, called ingestion , has to take place before anything else can happen.

The large pieces of food that are ingested have to be broken into smaller particles that can be acted upon by various enzymes. This is mechanical digestion, which begins in the mouth with chewing or mastication and continues with churning and mixing actions in the stomach.

The complex molecules of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats are transformed by chemical digestion into smaller molecules that can be absorbed and utilized by the cells. Chemical digestion, through a process called hydrolysis , uses water and digestive enzymes to break down the complex molecules.

Your Digestive System | University of Michigan Health The monosaccharides combine Nuteient Nutrient absorption process Dehydration management proteins immediately after the absorptkon are broken down. About News Contact. Swallowing, done by muscle avsorption in the tongue and Nutrient absorption process, moves the food into the throat, or pharynx pronounced: FAIR-inks. The digestion of protein begins in the stomach and is completed in the small intestine. Food is our fuel, and its nutrients give our bodies' cells the energy and substances they need to work. Also, minerals, such as sodium and potassium, are absorbed.
Nutrient absorption process

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